Great News ! Pune institute close to finishing lab model of solar ultraviolet imaging telescope | Pune IUCAA team Develops 1 telescope to capture solar ultraviolet imaging.

Pune’s IUCAA team develops space telescope to capture ultraviolet imaging of Sun

The observations recorded by SUIT will put India among the top countries to have observed the Sun in the ultraviolet

SUIT has been built under the leadership of Prof AN Ramprakash and Prof Durgesh Tripathi at IUCAA in close collaboration with ISRO. (SOURCED)

Pune institute close to finishing lab model of solar ultraviolet imaging telescope

The city-based Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) has developed a unique space telescope Solar Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SUIT). The telescope was delivered to Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on June 6 and will be integrated with the ADITYA-L1 mission as an essential instrument in its array. It will then be launched along with the satellite to fly 15 lakh kilometres towards the Sun (to the L1 point) and provide regular images and updates about the Sun’s surface phenomena and space weather.

SUIT has been built under the leadership of Prof AN Ramprakash and Prof Durgesh Tripathi at IUCAA in close collaboration with ISRO. (SOURCED)

SUIT has been built under the leadership of Prof AN Ramprakash and Prof Durgesh Tripathi at IUCAA in close collaboration with ISRO.

The observations recorded by SUIT will put India among the top countries to have observed the Sun in the ultraviolet.

Ramprakash said, “SUIT is one of the main payloads on Aditya-L1. It will provide full disk images of the Sun in the 2000 – 4000 A wavelength range. Full disk images in the entire wavelength range have never been obtained. Among many, there are a few fundamental questions that SUIT will address, for example, the existence of a higher temperature atmosphere above the cooler surface, the origin and variation of near-ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, and high energy explosions such as solar flares observed in the solar atmosphere, etc.”

“With its observational capabilities, SUIT will provide observations of the solar atmosphere slicing through different layers, which is missing and considered to be of utmost importance to fully comprehend the complete transport of mass energy within the various layers,” he added.

An image of the SUIT — Solar Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope — one of the most important payloads of Aditya-L1 mission. 

The overall weight of the payload is 45 kg. It’s 1.5 meters long and the width is 1/2 meter. The telescope is expected to provide images after 112 days of its launch.

“The data will be received by ISRO, it will be sent to the payload operation Centre that will be set up in IUCAA. The scientists will process the information and then it will be sent back to ISRO,” said Tripathi.

Additional information About IUCAA & Aditya L-1:

The discovery of gravitational waves in 2015, for which three scientists received the Nobel Prize in physics this year, gave the city-based Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) plenty of reasons to cheer, as many of its scientists had actively collaborated in the global effort to detect gravitational waves. Now, another team of scientists is all set to bring more glory to the IUCAA, as they give finishing touches to the laboratory model of one of the most important payloads that will be put on Aditya L-1 mission, the Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO’s) first attempt to study the sun.

The Aditya-L1 mission is scheduled to to be launched some time in 2019 or 2020. Initially meant to observe only the corona, the outermost part of the sun, the mission has been expanded and now aims to look much deeper into the sun than has ever been done before. Accordingly, several additional instruments are to be put on a much bigger satellite than was earlier planned.

One of the most important ones, called Solar Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, or SUIT, is being developed at IUCAA. This telescope is going to measure the radiations coming from one of the middle layers of the sun, the photosphere. Not a part of the original mission plan, SUIT is now the second biggest instrument to go on the satellite. The biggest one, known as the Visible Emission Line Coronagraph, or VELC, is being developed at the Bengaluru-based Indian Institute of Astrophysics. Meant to study the corona, the VELC was supposed to be the only payload in the original plan for Aditya mission.

Leave a comment